Fun With Companies

So, I’m actually not in San Jose right now (despite recently getting housed there)
and a lot of you have been writing in to see what I’m actually doing. I’m starting  a company: FoundThere.com. (There isn’t a hyperlink for a reason – there isn’t a website yet!) We’re fully incorporated and licensed for business in California. Now we just need to make some money. =)

I’m starting this company as the founder: i.e., I’m the one whose job it is to make this company actually happen and take off. I have two compatriots who (out of the kindness of their hearts and for half of the company) are providing office space, money, and connections for me. The only catch is that they’re in Los Angeles. I’ve made two promises
to myself regarding my career: I will never work for Microsoft and I will never live in L.A. Ack.

So I’m working with a bunch of really cool people in this office: they’re all Korean and working on sites like Koreanz.com (go and learn how to read Korean!) and TuneWiz.
Very smart folks, but it is sort of unreal to be sitting around and be the only one who can’t understand anything being said in the office. (Everyone else here is Korean!) The upside? Korean BBQ. Mmmmm….and they’re teaching me how you’re *actually* supposed to use chopsticks. In return, I explain floss to them. =) It’s fun.

Probably the saddest part about all of this is it means that I can’t be up by Stanford with Vanessa; we’re on our third year of doing Argentine Tango together and are both beginning to really get the hang of it. So it’s pretty sad to not be getting to practice all those really cool moves with her. [sigh]

But short of that, I’m now over (I think!) my incredibly nasty 2-week-long cough cum cold cum NOSE-RUNNING-LIKE-A-FAUCET bout with influenza (aka “the flu”) likely cured courtesy of a warmed cocktail of voodoo drugs given to me by my Korean friends. “Chinese medicine!” they stammer out to me in the friendliest broken English ever, handing me a hot chemical bottle with absolutely no English on it, but pages worth of Korean (presumably warnings). [giggle] “Did you just give me liquid crack?” I asked them (which, once translated back to Korean, was actually still funny). Whatever it was, I’m better now. Ah. And I just bought “Unix Network Programming” by Stevens. Yay! Fun reading – one of the best technical books ever! =)

Author: dweekly

I like to start things. :)